Crowd Analytics and Mass Behaviours during New Year’s Events

new years fireworks


February 13th, 2020 – Singapore


While waiting for the 2019 countdown or celebrating the Year of the Rat, did you ever come to watch the New Year’s Eve fireworks just to find out that many people had already occupied all the best spots? Did you then wonder when they were coming to get a good place? Was the area so packed that you felt that it is not possible to move at all?

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Drone video of the New Year’s Eve Countdown in Johor Bahru, Malaysia, showing the crowd gathered for the event (video: courtesy of UEM Group).

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Today, with Crowd Analytics, it is possible to give an analytical answer with actionable data to these questions.

According to the LBASense system’s measurements taken in multiple locations around the globe on New Year’s Eve 2019 and Chinese New Year 2020, it’s seems that a small number of people usually arrive to get a good location to see the fireworks as early as 16:00 on New Year’s Eve and most of the crowd arrives around 22:30. So if you want to get a good spot next year, you will probably need to come earlier.

While many people complain that the area is very packed and that it is not possible to move, around a third of the crowd is continuously walking until the moment when the fireworks start, while two-thirds of the crowd stay static during the hour before midnight.

 

Screenshot from the LBASense Dashboard comparing 8 different areas in the city of Bologna, Italy, during New Year's Eve 2019 (in partnership with the EU Cultural Heritage preservation project ROCK).
Screenshot from the LBASense Dashboard comparing 8 different areas in the city of Bologna, Italy, during New Year’s Eve 2019 (in partnership with the EU Cultural Heritage preservation project ROCK).

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In Bologna, Italy, (above image), LBASense sensors have analysed eight different areas of the city centre to understand which zone was the most popular during New Year’s Eve and until what time the crowd gathered.

Such data is indeed interesting for citizens and tourists but is also key for public transportation planners, restaurants and  Smart and Safe City planners in general, who can access valuable information about the crowd’s behaviour during massive public gatherings.

Based on the detection of mobile phone signals, LBASense sensors can be mounted on drones or deployed in weatherproof boxes to monitor a large crowd gathered at a free public event.

If you wish to deploy a similar system in your city, contact us.

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Photo credits: Featured image of the Netherlands by Bram Naus, free of copyright license; for all other images, all rights reserved to DFRC.